Why is To Kill a Mockingbird told from Scout’s point of view?

Her youth, her innocence, acute sense of justice and naïve point of view, these are all the reasons why Scout is the narrator of the novel. She is just an innocent child when the story begins, yet we get to see her grow up and see how everything that happens around her makes her change and grow up.

While Scout remains the narrator throughout the book, her involvement in the events she describes changes once Tom Robinson’s trial becomes the focus. The use of a child narrator enables the reader to see the action through fresh eyes, but Scout’s age also limits the narrative, especially in its treatment of race.

Secondly, is Scout a reliable narrator in To Kill a Mockingbird? The role of narrator in To Kill a Mockingbird is served by Scout Finch. Scout is a reliable narrator because she tells the events as she remembers them from her perspective as a young girl with honesty and naivety.

In respect to this, what point of view is to kill a mockingbird?

Harper Lee chose to narrate To Kill a Mockingbird through the eyes of Scout Finch, the youngest character in the novel. It is written in first-person, but the unusual aspect of it is that the novel is told from both the youthful child’s point-of-view as well as from her mature, adult perspective.

What does Scout’s response reveal about her?

Scout’s violent responses depict her short-temper and aggressive personality. Scout is an immature child, who struggles to appropriately express her negative emotions. Her initial instincts are to fight, which is something that Atticus discourages and hopes that she will overcome.

Why does Scout narrate the story?

Her youth, her innocence, acute sense of justice and naïve point of view, these are all the reasons why Scout is the narrator of the novel. She is just an innocent child when the story begins, yet we get to see her grow up and see how everything that happens around her makes her change and grow up.

Why is it a sin to kill a mockingbird?

In the novel itself, Miss Maudie explains to Scout why Atticus declared that it was a sin to kill a mockingbird: “Mockingbirds don’t do one thing but make music for us to enjoy. They don’t eat up people’s gardens, don’t nest in corncribs, don’t do one thing but sing their hearts out of us.

What is the tone of To Kill a Mockingbird?

The tone of To Kill a Mockingbird changes over the course of the novel from chatty and innocent to dark and knowing as Scout loses a degree of her innocence. At the beginning of the novel, as Scout recounts a series of anecdotes describing growing up in a small Southern town, the tone is light and nostalgic.

What type of character is Scout?

Scout Finch is a character with a memorable personality. She is an outspoken tomboy who will fight when she thinks she is right. Scout is also a girl who loses her innocence as the novel progresses.

Why is scout a tomboy?

Some factors that might influence Scout’s tomboy nature include the following: she is the only girl in her family, she enjoys her independence, she has fun being around Jem, and she is raised by her father. Atticus also doesn’t mind Scout’s tomboy personality and actually encourages his daughter to be herself.

How does Scout change throughout the story?

In the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, Scout changes throughout the story. As a six year old innocent child, Scout is a tom-boy who tries to keep up with her 10 year old brother, Jem . She is willing to fight to keep her place in the games they play, and is willing to fight for what she thinks is right.

How does Scout relate to other characters?

During the novel I noticed that Scout developed many different relationships with many of the other characters such as Atticus, Miss Maudie, Mrs. Dubose, Calpurnia and Boo Radley. All of these characters taught Scout important lessons through the novel that helped her mature as a person.

What is the setting of how do you kill a mockingbird?

The setting of the novel takes place in the small town of Maycomb, Alabama during the early 1930s. In Chapter 1 , Scout describes Maycomb as a tired, old town where people moved slowly.

What are the symbols in To Kill a Mockingbird?

Terms in this set (16) Mockingbird. Only do good things for society, so hurting or killing one is a sin, represents Boo and Tom and maybe Atticus, but it is more likely that he is just the one who said it. Camellias. courage, forgiveness. Knothole (and its contents) Tom Robinson. Red geraniums. Boo Radley. Atticus. Blanket.

What is the conflict in To Kill a Mockingbird?

To Kill a Mockingbird has one major conflict with other smaller conflicts. This major conflict is the trial of Tom Robinson, person vs. person. Tom Robinson, an African American is accused of raping Mayella Ewell the daughter of Bob Ewell.

What is the plot of how do you kill a mockingbird?

Plot Overview. Scout Finch lives with her brother, Jem, and their widowed father, Atticus, in the sleepy Alabama town of Maycomb. Maycomb is suffering through the Great Depression, but Atticus is a prominent lawyer and the Finch family is reasonably well off in comparison to the rest of society.

How does Scout show innocence in To Kill a Mockingbird?

Scout, who is very young when the novel opens, is innocent because she has not yet internalized the values of the adult world. Her innocence is on open display in an early comic interlude when she inadvertently offends her new, out-of-town schoolteacher by already knowing how to read.

Why is Boo Radley so fascinating?

Arthur “Boo” Radley is an important person to Jem, Scout, and Dill because in many ways, he is a “blank slate” that their young imaginations can write on. He is a mystery, is almost never seen, and is the object of all sorts of crazy rumors about town.

What is the narrator of To Kill a Mockingbird?

Jean Louise “Scout” Finch is the narrator of To Kill a Mockingbird. She is an adult at the time she narrates the book, but the book is told from her perspective as a young child over a period of years from about six to nine. A first person point of view is used, with an unreliable narrator.